Sevilla

NEIGHBOURHOODS

Alameda

ONCE home to sailors, potters, Flamenco dancers and bull-fighters, Triana’s rich history is as colourful as its buildings which light up the river bank on its iconic Calle Betis. The barrio was once known as an arrabal, the name given to areas separated from the centre of Sevilla. And many in the town still see themselves as strictly trianero and distinct from the rest of the Sevillanos, often referring to the neighbourhood as the Independent Republic of Triana. Believed to have been founded by a Roman colony under emperor Trajan, it is entered by crossing the Isabel II bridge, a landmark in itself. It’s home to a traditional pottery and tile industry – with a museum paying homage to the crafts – vibrant flamenco festivals and hugely popular markets and festivals. Whether it’s enjoying a rooftop lunch with stunning views, enjoying a riverside walk or taking in the many cultural sites, a trip to Triana is a must when in Sevilla.

Alfalfa

ALFALFA is a typical Sevilla neighbourhood, filled with narrow streets, independent businesses and fantastic tapas bars. So fantastic, in fact, that Barack Obama couldn’t help but pay a visit last year after attending the WTTC Global Summit in April. The former US president didn’t stick around to enjoy the string of late-night bars however, or check out the ever-growing Soho Benita area. Alfalfa - literally meaning horse feed - gets its name from storing the stuff there during the Reconquest. However the barrio has been around since Roman times and once hosted a thriving silk market during the Moorish period.

La Cartuja

La Cartuja is best known for being home to the Isla Magica and Agua Magica theme parks. Locals and tourists flock to the attractions in the hotter months for their rollercoasters and extensive water slides. But once home to the Exposicion Universal 1992, the neighbourhood, north of Triana, is home to a lot more. Its sites include the expansive Jardines del Guadalquivir, containing a maze, a 15th century monastery and a selection of popular nightclubs and live music venues.

Macarena

MACARENA is to Seville what Shoreditch once was to London. Packed full of young professionals, it is fast becoming the coolest neighbourhood in which to live, work and play, offering a perfect combination of hidden bars and an evolving food scene while serving up heaps of history. The name itself hints at its rich past, with experts disagreeing over whether it came from a wealthy Roman landowner named Macarius or from its still existing city-wall, dubbed the Bab-al-Makrin by the Moors who rebuilt it almost 1,000 years ago. Regardless, the barrio is filled with remnants of its past and is well worth a visit if you want something different from the heaving and packed city centre. The neighbourhood of La Macarena lends its name to the sculpture of Virgin of Hope of Macarena, sometimes known simply as La Macarena.[3] Many Sevillian women are named after this statue. This gave rise to the name of Los del Río's Spanish-language song "Macarena". Monuments and landmarks The neighborhood is known for housing the Basilica of Nuestra Señora de la Esperanza Macarena (Our Lady of Hope of Macarena), seat of the homonymous Holy Week brotherhood. The procession in the early morning of Good Friday is one of the largest, most popular, and fervent in the whole of Spain. The wooden statue of Our Lady of Hope Macarena dates from the 17th century. The Neobaroque Basilica was built by Aurelio Gómez Millán in the 20th century.[4] Next to the church is placed the Museum and Treasure of La Macarena, where the huge artistic and sentimental patrimony of the brotherhood is exposed, working as a complete explanation about the famous Holy Week processions of Seville. The largest remaining portion of the Almohad city walls is to be found in La Macarena neighbourhood. It spans two of the old city gates, from the monumental Puerta de la Macarena (Macarena gate) in the west, next to the Basilica, to the Puerta de Cordoba (Córdoba gate) in the east, and annex to San Hermenegildo church. Macarena gate The Parliament of Andalusia is housed in the old building of the Hospital de las Cinco Llagas (literally, Hospital of the Five Holy Wounds). Dated from 16th century, it is one of the best examples of Andalusian Mannerism. The Torre de los Perdigones (literally, Tower of the Pellets), placed in Los Perdigones gardens next to the Guadalquivir river, is the last remain of a foundry building from the late 19th century. Since 2007 it contains a panoramic room-sized camera obscura.[5] In the nearby Feria street is located the oldest marketplace of Seville, the Mercado de la Feria. The building dates from 18th century and [6] the greengrocer's, butcher's and fishmonger's stalls constitute a traditional and picturesque scene of Seville daily life. Transport One can get to and from La Macarena by bus. The TUSSAM C3/C4 lines are circular, running clockwise and counter clockwise all along the periphery of the historical center, and have many stops in the neighborhood. Lines C1/C2 are also circular, and connect La Macarena with outer neighbourhoods, such as Nervión, La Cartuja and Los Remedios.

Santa Cruz

SANTA Cruz is the most visited neighbourhood by the millions of tourists who flock to Sevilla each year. And it’s no surprise, given it houses the city’s most important and visited sites, including the iconic Real Alcazar. The old Jewish Quarter of Sevilla, the barrio was an artistic hub and home to some of the Golden Age’s most important maestros, including David Velazquez and Bartolome Murillo - the latter of which has stunning gardens named after him. Disaster struck Santa Cruz when it was almost wiped out by the Lisbon Earthquake in 1755. But out of the rubble a well-to-do neighbourhood was constructed as many middle class families decided to build homes in the area. Today it has become emblematic of Sevilla, boasting narrow streets and 11 picturesque plazas. It is also home to fantastic restaurants and cafes.

Triana

ONCE home to sailors, potters, Flamenco dancers and bull-fighters, Triana’s rich history is as colourful as its buildings which light up the river bank on its iconic Calle Betis. The barrio was once known as an arrabal, the name given to areas separated from the centre of Sevilla. And many in the town still see themselves as strictly trianero and distinct from the rest of the Sevillanos, often referring to the neighbourhood as the Independent Republic of Triana. Believed to have been founded by a Roman colony under emperor Trajan, it is entered by crossing the Isabel II bridge, a landmark in itself. It’s home to a traditional pottery and tile industry – with a museum paying homage to the crafts – vibrant flamenco festivals and hugely popular markets and festivals. Whether it’s enjoying a rooftop lunch with stunning views, enjoying a riverside walk or taking in the many cultural sites, a trip to Triana is a must when in Sevilla.

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Sevilla: What to see in Alfalfa

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